Helping You to Find the Best Assisted Living Homes in Seguin, TX

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There is no cost to families for Bill and Claudia Johnsons’ placement services. Bill and Claudia spend much of her time touring and reviewing local living communities – including assisted living, independent living, dementia and memory care, and residential care homes in Seguin, TX, Texas and San Antonio area. Bill and Claudia then meet one-on-one with families to assess their needs. They accompany them on tours of pre-approved facilities, assist them with their negotiations and paperwork, and follow up once your loved ones has moved in.

Who's Senior Care Authority?

Senior Care Authority has the expertise to help you identify and access all available options in assisted living and memory care in Seguin, TX, Texas. We offer no-cost services to help you find appropriate senior living when your loved one can no longer care for themselves at home. Our personalized, face-to-face assistance can help relieve some of the stress and overwhelm during this difficult transition - our expertise and compassion will help lighten the load for you and your family.

Serving Seguin, TX

Facts about Seguin, TX

Seguin is a city in and the county seat of Guadalupe County, Texas, United States. As of the 2010 census the population was 25,175. By 2015, the population was estimated to be 27,864.

Seguin is one of the oldest towns in Texas, founded just sixteen months after the Texas Revolution. The frontier settlement was a cradle of the Texas Rangers and home to the celebrated Captain Jack Hays, perhaps the most famous Ranger of all.

Seguin was the home of Dr. John E. Park, who experimented in construction using concrete made from local materials. The nearly 100 structures—the courthouse, schools, churches, homes, cisterns, walls, etc.—made up the largest concentration of early 19th-century concrete buildings in the United States. About 20 of them remain standing.

The use of concrete largely ended when the railroad arrived in 1876, bringing cheap lumber and the equipment needed for brick-making. The town had five brickworks, and the wooden buildings of downtown were completely replaced with brick by the beginning of World War I.

For almost 100 years, the town was dependent on the rich surrounding farmland and ranches. Then an oil boom came just as the Great Depression was taking down other towns and cities. Seguin could raise enough tax money to match the federal grants for "make-work" projects. The New Deal transformed the city's public face with Art Deco-style City Hall, Courthouse, Jail, and fountain, as well as storm sewers, sidewalks, and three swimming pools (one for Anglos, one for blacks, one for Hispanics). The town commemorated its centennial by opening Max Starcke Park, with a golf course, a pavilion, picnic tables and BBQ pits along a scenic river drive, and a curving dam that created a waterfall.

To preserve some of the historic character of the town, Seguin became one of the state's first Main Street cities, and the downtown district was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Fine homes by leading architects J. Reily Gordon, Solon McAdoo, Leo M.J. Dielman, Atlee B. Ayers, and Marvin Eickenroht dating from the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century can be found on many streets. However, the city does not have any officially designated historic residential districts.

The post-war era saw industrial development, including a mini-mill that turned scrap metal into construction products. A plant was built by Motorola in 1972 to produce car electronics. It was bought by Continental AG in 2006. A Caterpillar diesel engine assembly plant was opened in 2008.

Demographics

As of the census of 2010, there were 25,175 people, up from 22,011 in 2000. There were 8,794 households, and 5,968 families residing in the city. In 2000, the population density was 1,157.2 people per square mile (446.8/km²)., and there were 8,164 housing units at an average density of 429.2 per square mile (165.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city in 2000 was 75.9% White, 8.0% African American, 0.61% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 13.6% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 55.4% of the population.

AVERAGE RATING:

out of 25 reviews

Reviews

AVERAGE RATING:

out of 25 reviews